Didactic Curriculum

First Year

It all starts with the foundational basic science courses in Pathophysiology, Medicinal Chemistry, Immunology and Microbiology, Biotechnology and Molecular Biology, which will prepare you for all your future coursework with an understanding of drug chemistry, bodily processes of disease states, pathogens, and molecular processes. You’ll already start putting that understanding into practice in your pharmacology, therapeutics, and pharmacogenomics courses.

Some highlights:

  • Basic Sciences provide the foundation and building blocks for all other coursework
  • Professional practice course series frames the roles and responsibilities of the pharmacist necessary in understanding the pharmacist’s relationships with patients and to the health delivery system
  • Cultural Competency is your first interprofessional education course
  • As early as spring semester you’ll start your clinical exposure and hands-on experience in the lab and you’ll start to learn how to make non-sterile dosage forms
  • Introduction to the PPCP model
  • Simulation learning starts and you’ll have your first exposure and begin to navigate the electronic health records system and physician order platforms
P1 FALL

PBSN 508 - Pharmaceutics I (Pharmaceutical Calculations)* (3 Credits)

The course will introduce students to the knowledge and skills of fundamental mathematical calculations utilized in pharmacy practice and the practice of pharmacy compounding. Emphasis will be placed on improving and applying problem-solving skills for the needs of an individual patient within the practice of pharmacy.

PBSN 520 - Immunology and Microbiology (3 Credits)

Medical Microbiology & Immunology is a lecture-style course that presents an overview of disease-associated microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. Particular emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of classes of therapeutics traditionally used to combat these disease-inducing microbes. An overview of the immune system will be presented emphasizing the complexity and diversity of the immune response, the molecules involved in regulating the immune system, and the drug interventions that are designed to regulate the immune system.

PBSN 526 - Pathophysiology (3 Credits)

This course is designed as an orientation to disease as disordered physiology. It provides a comprehensive theoretical foundation of the mechanisms that produce altered physiologic function across the life continuum. Pharmacy students are prepared for courses related to management and preliminary diagnosis and disease processes associated with pathophysiologic dysfunction.

PBSN 527 - Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry I (4 Credits)

The pharmacology and medicinal chemistry series of courses provide an integrated approach in explaining the mechanisms of drug effects on the human body (i.e. pharmacodynamics) as well as how the human body affects the drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). Students will gain a fundamental and practiced knowledge of the principles of drug mechanism of action including receptor theory, membrane permeation, and distribution. Students will be able to explain and predict the chemical basis of drug action and metabolism based on molecular structure of the therapeutic agent. Pharmacology is the study of the chemical or therapeutic molecules that affect living matter, whereas Medicinal Chemistry correlates the chemical structure of these agents to their activity (i.e. Structure-Activity-Relationships), pharmacokinetics, and physicochemical properties. Identifying the molecular features of drugs that influence many of their therapeutic, as well as adverse effects, allows pharmacists to optimize drug therapy and avoid unwanted adverse effects. Thus, a complete understanding of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry enables pharmacists to provide more comprehensive pharmaceutical care to their patients.

PBSN 534 - Biotechnology & Molecular Biology (2 Credits)

This course will help students acquire a basic understanding of the principles and applications of molecular biology and compare and contrast the array of biotechnology and bioengineering processes available for drug design and production. Students are expected to apply knowledge learned in this course to develop individualized and targeted patient care plans to maximize therapeutic outcomes. Molecular biology topics covered include the chemistry of DNA and proteins, macromolecular structural organization, regulation of gene expression and molecular interactions. Biotechnology topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular diagnostics, therapeutic applications of recombinant proteins, oligonucleotides and monoclonal antibodies, delivery of therapeutic genes and proteins, targeted drug delivery systems and their applications. An emphasis is placed on current biotechnology products and upcoming innovations. Biologics or biotechnology products used in vaccination, inflammation and cancer are also an essential part of the course.

PHPN 500 - Medical Terminology I (0 Credits)

The primary goal of this two-semester course sequence is to introduce students to commonly used medical terminologies in healthcare settings. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify, define, accurately spell, and describe medical terminologies and abbreviations reviewed in this course. Each topic will be introduced in separate modules. Additionally, students will be provided with online flash-cards of medical terminologies. Students may study these terms at their own pace. At the end of each module, there will be assignments to complete, and students must submit the assignment via Canvas in order to advance to the next module.

SBAN 570 - Professional Practice I (Introduction to Pharmacy) (2 Credits)

This course introduces students to concepts and skills fundamental to the practice of pharmacy. The skills introduced in this course are not only the foundation of pharmacy practice; they are skills that require a lifelong commitment for developing professional and personal growth mainly through an exploration of the affective domain.

Total Credits = 17
P1 SPRING

PBSN 509 - Pharmaceutics II* (Pharmaceutical Chemistry Dosage Form and Drug Delivery) (4 Credits)

The course will introduce the student to aspects of traditional physical pharmacy of drugs and dosage forms. The course will focus on the physicochemical properties of drug compounds and dosage forms. An important component of drug therapy is the selection of the dosage form. Some of the factors considered in the selection process include patient factors, the route of administration, the design of the dosage form, socio-economic factors, concurrent drug administration, and the disease state. The pharmacist needs to communicate with other health care professionals and with the patient, evaluate the patient's data and integrate the findings with the scientific knowledge of formulation, design and use, in order to select the appropriate dosage form. The scientific aspects of the design, preparation, storage, packaging, stability, incompatibilities, dispensing and use of polyphasic systems, including suspensions, and emulsions, otic and nasal products, dermal and transdermal products, suppositories, powders and granules, capsules, tablets, aerosols, rate-controlled and targeted drug delivery systems are necessary considerations of dosage form selection. Attention will be paid to the theory, technology, formulation, and evaluation and dispensing of a variety of dosage forms. Students will gain practical experience in laboratories in compounding, dispensing and reading and interpreting prescriptions. Prerequisite: PBSN 508

PBSN 529 - Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry II (3 Credits)

The pharmacology and medicinal chemistry series of courses provide an integrated approach in explaining the mechanisms of drug effects on the human body (i.e. pharmacodynamics) as well as how the human body affects the drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). Students will gain a fundamental and practiced knowledge of the principles of drug mechanism of action including receptor theory, membrane permeation, and distribution. Students will be able to explain and predict the chemical basis of drug action and metabolism based on molecular structure of the therapeutic agent. Pharmacology is the study of the chemical or therapeutic molecules that affect living matter, whereas Medicinal Chemistry correlates the chemical structure of these agents to their activity (i.e. Structure-Activity-Relationships), pharmacokinetics, and physicochemical properties. Identifying the molecular features of drugs that influence many of their therapeutic as well as adverse effects allows pharmacists to optimize drug therapy and avoid unwanted adverse effects. Thus, a complete understanding of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry enables pharmacists to provide more comprehensive pharmaceutical care to their patients.

PHPN 501 - Medical Terminology II (0 Credits)

The primary goal of this two-semester course sequence is to introduce students to commonly used medical terminologies in healthcare settings. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify, define, accurately spell, and describe medical terminologies and abbreviations reviewed in this course. Each topic will be introduced in separate modules. Additionally, students will be provided with online flash-cards of medical terminologies. Students may study these terms at their own pace. At the end of each module, there will be assignments to complete, and students must submit the assignment via Canvas in order to advance to the next module.

PHPN 581 - Pharmacotherapeutics I* (3 Credits)

The four-semester pharmacotherapeutics sequence of coursework that runs throughout the didactic component of the program provides an integrated approach in understanding pathophysiology and applied therapeutics. Students will learn to apply basic knowledge of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry on appropriate drug selection and monitoring for specific disease states. Pharmacotherapeutics incorporates the principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting. Through reinforcement of the basic science principles relative to drug action, the student will learn to apply organ systems-based knowledge to clinical practice setting and learn associated disease state management. In addition to the lecture hours, these courses offer a required weekly recitation session. During recitations, students will engage in group activities and discussions related to patient cases that are based on select topics/disease states introduced in class during any given week. Students will be asked drug therapy management questions similar to those arising in real clinical settings. Prerequisites: PBSN 525, PBSN 527

SBAN 504 - Health care systems & Health Policies (3 Credits)

In the context of the rather complex healthcare system in the United States that the pharmacist, like other healthcare providers, has to navigate in order to provide the needed services for patients, the primary goal of this course is to provide a thorough understanding of the healthcare system, health care delivery in the various settings and how services are paid for in the United States and draw parallels with selected developed and developing countries healthcare systems. An additional goal is to promote the pharmacist as a public health advocate in addition to providing patient-centered care. This course describes the components of a healthcare system; the goals and functions of the system, and how the system is assessed for attainment, performance, and quality. It also examines the key features of the U.S. healthcare system, the organization of healthcare delivery in the U.S., and the financing mechanisms for paying for healthcare; these are compared with those from other countries. Healthcare system regulation is covered by addressing health policy development, implementation, and evaluation and health care reform with special reference to the Affordable Care Act (ACA, 2010). The rising healthcare and medication costs in the U.S. and the strategies for containing those, whiles promoting access, quality, and equity in the system are addressed. An overview of basic public health concepts, key agencies in the U.S. Public Health Service and Pharmacy practice and career paths in the U.S. Public Health Service conclude the course.

SBAN 540 - Drug information and Literature Evaluation (3 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to help students develop foundational skills and knowledge needed in providing accurate, balanced, fair, and evidence-based drug information throughout the didactic and experiential curriculum and, eventually, as health care professionals. At the end of the course, students should be able to effectively use various drug information resources, conduct comprehensive literature searches using different databases, and critically evaluate and summarize clinical literature to provide evidence-based recommendations. Additionally, through in-class activities and assignments, students will develop written and verbal drug information communication skills. Additionally, students will learn biostatistical concepts and literature evaluation skills that are needed for interpreting clinical trial results to apply the information in patient care. Finally, students will gain understanding of how drug information skills are used in different practice settings. Throughout the course, there will be assignments and active learning activities. These are designed to complement the didactic lectures.

SBAN 560 - Cultural Competency (1 Credit)

This Introduction to Cultural Competency course will introduce and sensitize students to the challenges of providing quality, culturally-appropriate and patient-centered healthcare that maximizes patient health outcomes. Students will be introduced to historical contexts, observations, experiences, and case studies involving diverse populations/patient groups in order to develop their awareness and sensitivities and their appreciation of the importance of cultural competence when caring for these traditionally under-represented patients. Students will understand the health disparities routinely experienced by racial/ethnic minorities, populations/patient groups based on their gender, age, socioeconomic, and insurance status, as well as religious or cultural beliefs and practices, sexual orientation, and physical and mental disabilities. Students will learn about the healthcare policy frameworks, the healthcare systems, and provider-related strategies for caring for diverse patient populations as well as people with various socially stigmatized illnesses including HIV/AIDS and mental health conditions. Since this course strategically enrolls both medical and pharmacy students, the students will also be introduced to interprofessional education (IPE) and the competencies of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) as interprofessional practice (IPP) has proven to be effective in promoting and improving healthcare quality and patient health outcomes.

SBAN 571 - Professional Practice II (Patient Provider Communications) (3 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to prepare students to become proficient in applying sound theories of patient-level counseling and population-level intervention to promote health. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to: Define and apply in clinical scenarios, proficiency in basic communication skills with patients and other health professionals; Define the theoretical basis of patient communication as applied to patient counseling in various setting and design appropriate patient counseling interventions based on the appropriate theoretical framework; Define the theoretical basis of patient communication as applied to patient counseling in various setting and design appropriate patient counseling interventions based on the appropriate theoretical framework; Describe communication modalities with low health literate patients and design a patient-specific communication plan; and design written health communication material for professionals. The course presents theoretical concepts and applications of such concepts in pharmacy practice through role-play sessions, class projects, and online activities. Prerequisite: SBAN 570

Total Credits = 20
P1 SUMMER

EXPN 512 - IPPE Community Pharmacy (5 Credits)

This is an experiential education course introducing students to the practice of community pharmacy. The course provides students with an overview of the practice and enables the student to integrate classroom knowledge with practical experience. This experience seeks to provide students with direct exposure to the dynamics of the community pharmacy practice and to guide them to a realistic assessment of the challenges and opportunities that exist. Prerequisites: Successful completion first year didactic year requirements.

Notes: *Courses with laboratories or recitations.

Second Year

You have a strong foundation and you’ll build upon that, as we emphasize the development of the Essentials of Practice and Care skills.

You will continue learning therapeutics, pharmaceutics, and pharmacology and medicinal chemistry and you’ll start learning pharmacokinetics and clinical pharmacokinetics to gain a better understanding of the disposition of the drug in the body and its role in therapeutic decisions.

Some other courses you’ll start taking involve the economics of pharmaceuticals, a deeper understanding of the role of the pharmacist, and the importance of physical assessment:

  • Principles of Management, Pharmacoeconomics, and Outcomes Research illustrates the economic factors involved in pharmacist decision-making; the management of the processes and resources necessary for the safe and efficient application of their decision-making; and the measurement of the outcomes as a result of pharmacist decisions.
  • A sequence in self-care shows how a pharmacist impacts patients and their care-givers beyond the immediate healthcare environment.
  • Physical assessment plays a key role in collecting, assessing, monitoring and evaluating.
  • Pharmacogenomics and its role in further optimizing drug therapy.

Highlights:

  • Deepening understanding of clinical care and approaches to therapy with increasing patient case complexities
  • Continued simulation training
  • Continued interprofessional education
  • Two electives based on your interests and professional goals
P2 FALL

PBSN 610 - Pharmaceutics III* (Non‐Sterile Compounding)(3 Credits)

The course is a continuum of PBSN 509 Pharmaceutics II. Students will continue to learn and be equipped with the proper skills to compound non-sterile prescriptions in a manner that will ensure safe and effective administration to patients. Students will utilize previously learned compounding skills and build upon to prepare non-sterile products. Students will continue to perform calculations, determine the dose of products, identify stability of each preparation and compound prescriptions utilizing appropriate techniques. The students will fill capsules and prepare solutions, gels, suspensions and emulsion. In addition, they will prepare ointments, powders and suppositories. Correct method of manufacturing, proper documentation and labeling of the finished products will be covered and enforced during class. These activities will prepare students for the New York State part III examination and enable students to develop the pharmaceutical skills needs to understand the importance of preparing prescriptions in a safe and effective manner. Prerequisites: PBSN 508 and PBSN 509

PBSN 625 - Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry III (3 Credits)

(The pharmacology and medicinal chemistry series of courses provide an integrated approach in explaining the mechanisms of drug effects on the human body (i.e. pharmacodynamics) as well as how the human body affects the drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). Students will gain a fundamental and practiced knowledge of the principles of drug mechanism of action including receptor theory, membrane permeation, and distribution. Students will be able to explain and predict the chemical basis of drug action and metabolism based on molecular structure of the therapeutic agent. Pharmacology is the study of the chemical or therapeutic molecules that affect living matter, whereas Medicinal Chemistry correlates the chemical structure of these agents to their activity (i.e. Structure-Activity-Relationships), pharmacokinetics, and physicochemical properties. Identifying the molecular features of drugs that influence many of their therapeutic as well as adverse effects allows pharmacists to optimize drug therapy and avoid unwanted adverse effects. Thus, a complete understanding of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry enables pharmacists to provide more comprehensive pharmaceutical care to their patients. Prerequisites: PBSN 520, PBSN 529

PBSN 635 - Pharmacokinetics (2 Credits)

The goals of the required course are to provide the student with understanding of the factors involved in the processes of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This course will help students to acquire a basic understanding of the principles and applications of PK/PD and characterize drug pharmacokinetics mathematically. Students are expected to apply knowledge learned in this course to develop population and individualized patient care plans to maximize therapeutic outcomes. The course covers different steps of drug pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) and application of principles of pharmacokinetics to drug therapy. The students will learn that characterization of drug pharmacokinetics is an important prerequisite for determination of dosing regiments or modification of dosing regiments for patients. The relationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics will be explored. Prerequisite: PBSN 509

PHPN 650 - Self‐Care I (2 Credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the skills required to practice in an outpatient pharmacy setting. Students will be introduced to commonly encountered self-care disease states and will be able to identify appropriate therapies and provide effective patient education on drug dosing, adherence, administration techniques, anticipated adverse effects, potential drug interactions and the necessity for follow-up procedures as necessary. Self-care is a broad term that encompasses several concepts such as hygiene, nutrition, lifestyle, environmental factors, socioeconomic factors, self-medication, etc. Being one of the most accessible health care professionals, pharmacists play a crucial role in self-care requiring an in-depth knowledge of various disease states and therapies to ensure patient safety and improved health outcomes. This course will introduce students to common conditions and medications encountered in community-based settings through a series of didactic lectures. Prerequisite: Completion of first year courses

PHPN 682 - Pharmacotherapeutics II* (5 Credits)

The four-semester pharmacotherapeutics sequence of coursework that runs throughout the didactic component of the program provides an integrated approach in understanding pathophysiology and applied therapeutics. Students will learn to apply basic knowledge of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry on appropriate drug selection and monitoring for specific disease states. Pharmacotherapeutics incorporates the principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting. Through reinforcement of the basic science principles relative to drug action, the student will learn to apply organ systems-based knowledge to clinical practice setting and learn associated disease state management. In addition to the lecture hours, these courses offer a required weekly recitation session. During recitations, students will engage in group activities and discussions related to patient cases that are based on select topics/disease states introduced in class during any given week. Students will be asked drug therapy management questions similar to those arising in real clinical settings. Prerequisites: PBSN 529, PHPN 581

PHPN 684 - Foundations of Interprofessional Education and Practice Part I (0 Credits)

In order to practice efficiently, all health care professionals need to be adequately trained to interact and work with other health disciplines in order to achieve optimal outcomes for patients. The contemporary health care practice setting demands that pharmacists work in collaboration with physicians, nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, social workers, dentists, etc. In order to prepare our students for this type of practice, the goals for this two-semester course sequence are to provide experiences that will teach students how to work with other health disciplines, use the knowledge of their own profession to contribute to patient care within their scope, effectively communicate with professionals of other fields in a responsive and responsible manner, and to apply relationship-building values and the principles of team dynamics to work effectively with interprofessional team members to enhance care. The course may consist of, but will not be limited to, three possible types of IPE activities. The types of IPE activities may be simulation based in the med sim-lab, case-based in class where students work in small groups to compose a care plan for a given patient, and a virtual IPE experience where groups of students will simultaneously log-on to a virtual software platform to address a given patient case. Prerequisites: SBAN 560

SBAN 630 - Principles of Management & Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (3 Credits)

This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and basic knowledge of pharmacy management, pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. This course includes two modules—the first module consists of classes on pharmacy management, both institutional and community, and the second module consists of classes on pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to: Describe basic principles of pharmacy management; Develop an understanding of running a pharmacy service in an institution/healthcare system; Recognize the importance of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research in clinical practice; and Evaluate the appropriateness of pharmacoeconomic and outcomes studies.

Elective** (0-3 Credits)

Total Credits = 18-21
P2 SPRING

PBSN 611 - Pharmaceutics IV* (Sterile IV Compounding) (3 Credits)

This course is designed to enable the students to apply clinical knowledge learned in therapeutics, utilize skills learned in physical assessment, practice communication skills and apply these foundations to “real-life” patient situations in both a laboratory and didactic setting in order to understand the role of the pharmacist as a clinician. In addition, students will learn and practice techniques needed to compound sterile medications safely and help prepare them for the New York State Board Exam. Main topics covered include direct patient care by which students will practice pharmaceutical care, a term which encompasses the need for pharmacists to improve health outcomes by working with the patient and the patient’s health care provider through monitoring, initiating and modifying medication therapy to assure that drug therapy regimens are safe and effective. Direct patient care will be performed through laboratory exercises where students will be trained on simulated patient cases, perform dispensing procedures through interpretation and evaluation of prescriptions and application of NY state law prior to dispensing along with opportunities to provide counseling to patients on their drug therapy. Medication safety as an important part of patient care will be focused on through both didactic and laboratory exercises. Additional topics covered in class and laboratory activities include intravenous preparation. Students will perform appropriate calculations, identify stability of each preparation and prepare sterile compounds utilizing aseptic technique Prerequisites: PHRM 509, PBSN 610

PBSN 631 - Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry IV (3 Credits)

The pharmacology and medicinal chemistry series of courses provide an integrated approach in explaining the mechanisms of drug effects on the human body (i.e. pharmacodynamics) as well as how the human body affects the drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). Students will gain a fundamental and practiced knowledge of the principles of drug mechanism of action including receptor theory, membrane permeation, and distribution. Students will be able to explain and predict the chemical basis of drug action and metabolism based on molecular structure of the therapeutic agent. Pharmacology is the study of the chemical or therapeutic molecules that affect living matter, whereas Medicinal Chemistry correlates the chemical structure of these agents to their activity (i.e. Structure-Activity-Relationships), pharmacokinetics, and physicochemical properties. Identifying the molecular features of drugs that influence many of their therapeutic as well as adverse effects allows pharmacists to optimize drug therapy and avoid unwanted adverse effects. Thus, a complete understanding of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry enables pharmacists to provide more comprehensive pharmaceutical care to their patients. Prerequisite: PBSN 625

PBSN 636 - Pharmacogenomics (2 Credits)

The goals and objectives of this course are to provide the students with a solid foundation of the role of pharmacogenomics on therapeutic outcome and drug toxicity. The teaching and understanding of pharmacology and therapeutics of the 21st century are poised to apply individual genetic and molecular profiles to prognosis, prediction, cure, and prevention in pursuit of individualized health care. The course will focus on understanding genetic factors affecting the efficacy and toxicity of pharmacologic agents. Considerations of genomic and phenotypic information to personal pharmacotherapy, drug interaction and to minimize adverse events will be emphasized. Each student will work in a group throughout the semester. Groups perform secondary research on a specialized pharmacogenomic project and prepare a presentation relevant to the chosen topic. Topics will be provided at the beginning of the semester. Each group will choose a topic from a total of 18 different topics. Groups work at their own pace. Groups are to meet with the Course Coordinator for guidance and review of progress. The culmination of the Active Learning project is a formal presentation to the class. Prerequisites: PBSN 534

PHPN 637 - Physical Assessment* (3 Credits)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the skills required to perform physical assessment in various clinical settings and to reinforce the Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP) with a specific focus on collecting and assessing subjective and objective information. Students will be introduced to common interview and physical assessment techniques, as well as coached on providing effective patient education. The course will emphasize those exam techniques utilized in the community and ambulatory clinic settings (i.e. blood pressure and diabetic foot exam) as well as in acute care setting (i.e. cardiac and respiratory exams). During each didactic lecture the instructor will discuss examination techniques, including why each is significant for a pharmacist’s knowledge as well as what the examination is designed to illustrate. During the lab portion of this course students will be given the opportunity to practice examination techniques on their lab partners. The purpose of lab will be to foster the development of ability-based outcomes (ABOs) that will serve them during their APPE rotations and in clinical practice. Prerequisites: Completion of first year courses

PHPN 660 - Clinical Pharmacokinetics (3 Credits)

The goals of this course are to provide the student with understanding of the factors involved in the processes of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This course will help students to acquire a basic understanding of the principles and applications of PK/PD and characterize drug pharmacokinetics mathematically. Students are expected to apply knowledge learned in this course to develop population and individualized patient care plans to maximize therapeutic outcomes. Prerequisites: PHRM 635

PHPN 683 - Pharmacotherapeutics III* (5 Credits)

The four-semester pharmacotherapeutics sequence of coursework that runs throughout the didactic component of the program provides an integrated approach in understanding pathophysiology and applied therapeutics. Students will learn to apply basic knowledge of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry on appropriate drug selection and monitoring for specific disease states. Pharmacotherapeutics incorporates the principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting. Through reinforcement of the basic science principles relative to drug action, the student will learn to apply organ systems-based knowledge to clinical practice setting and learn associated disease state management. In addition to the lecture hours, these courses offer a required weekly recitation session. During recitations, students will engage in group activities and discussions related to patient cases that are based on select topics/disease states introduced in class during any given week. Students will be asked drug therapy management questions similar to those arising in real clinical settings. Prerequisites: PBSN 625, PHPN 581

PHPN 695 - Foundations of Interprofessional Education and Practice Part II (0 Credits)

In order to practice efficiently, all health care professionals need to be adequately trained to interact and work with other health disciplines in order to achieve optimal outcomes for patients. The contemporary health care practice setting demands that pharmacists work in collaboration with physicians, nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, social workers, dentists, etc. In order to prepare our students for this type of practice, the goals for this two-semester course sequence are to provide experiences that will teach students how to work with other health disciplines, use the knowledge of their own profession to contribute to patient care within their scope, effectively communicate with professionals of other fields in a responsive and responsible manner, and to apply relationship-building values and the principles of team dynamics to work effectively with interprofessional team members to enhance care. The course may consist of, but will not be limited to, three possible types of IPE activities. The types of IPE activities may be simulation based in the med sim-lab, case-based in class where students work in small groups to compose a care plan for a given patient, and a virtual IPE experience where groups of students will simultaneously log-on to a virtual software platform to address a given patient case. Prerequisites: PSBAN 560

Elective** (0-3 Credits)

Total Credits = 19-22
P2 SUMMER

EXPN 641 - IPPE Institutional Pharmacy (5 Credits)

This is an experiential education course introducing students to the practice of inpatient distribution facility of a hospital or other institutional health care settings. This experience seeks to provide students with direct exposure to the dynamics of the institutional pharmacy practice and to guide them to a realistic assessment of the challenges and opportunities that exist. Prerequisites: Successful completion second-year didactic year requirements

Notes: *Courses with laboratories or recitations.
**Two 3-credit didactic electives required. May be taken in the P2 fall semester, P2 spring semester and/or P3 fall semester.

Third Year

The first semester of the third year, the final didactic semester, provides the conclusion of the therapeutics sequence. It continues to deepen the understanding of approaches to therapy particularly in increasingly complex cases such as patients with comorbidities. You will integrate your knowledge from all disciplines and previous coursework and learn about additional complex considerations such as biomedical ethics, pharmacy law, and drug-induced diseases and toxicology.

Highlights:

  • Most coursework is comprehensive, with more complex considerations
  • Begin advanced practice experiences in the spring
P3 FALL

PHPN 721 - Drug‐induced diseases & Toxicology (3 Credits)

This course is designed to enable students to develop a broad-based knowledge of the pharmacological, medicinal chemical and pharmacotherapeutic basis of drug induced disease and clinical toxicology. Building on the foundation of the Pharmacist Patient Care Process (PPCP), students will develop a standardized approach for identifying signs and symptoms of toxic events and drug-induced diseases, thoroughly assessing patients, and providing appropriate therapy/monitoring recommendations/referral. This goal will be met through a series of didactic lectures and interactive patient cases. After the completion of the course, students should acquire the necessary skills to practice in emergency and outpatient settings and will aid in the transition to advanced pharmacy practice experiences. Prerequisites: Completion of first and second year courses

PHPN 722 - Comprehensive Patient Care Management (3 Credits)

PHPN 722 is a capstone course designed to strengthen and conclude the didactic curriculum through application of prior learning. This course will integrate essential core pharmacy therapeutics topics and management of various disease states. Emphasis will be placed on applying the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process to complex patient cases in order to develop rational evidence-based drug therapy, therapeutic monitoring and modification of drug therapy and medication regimens as dictated by changes in the patient’s characteristics, laboratory values and overall clinical status. Time in this course will be divided between self-study, problem-based learning and team-based learning. All course activities are designed to develop and improve critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making skills by working through complex patient scenarios mimicking clinical practice experiences. Completion of this course will empower the student to pursue self-directed lifelong learning in order to improve patient outcomes in the institutional and ambulatory care settings. Prerequisites: Completion of first and second year courses.

PHPN 751 - Self‐Care II (Comprehensive self‐care *) (2 Credits)

This course builds on the concepts introduced in PHPN 650 Self Care I. After the completion of this course, the student will be able to formulate patient-specific plans, and preform MTM services. The Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process will be utilized to prepare students to collect, assess, plan, implement, and follow-up with patient-specific pharmacotherapy recommendations for each topic covered. portion of this course consists of a practice-based certificate training program through the American Pharmacists Association, which will prepare student pharmacists to improve medication use through the delivery of MTM services in a variety of practice settings. Prerequisites: : PHPN 651 and PBSN 611

PHPN 784 - Pharmacotherapeutics IV* (5 Credits)

The four-semester pharmacotherapeutics sequence of coursework that runs throughout the didactic component of the program provides an integrated approach in understanding pathophysiology and applied therapeutics. Students will learn to apply basic knowledge of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry on appropriate drug selection and monitoring for specific disease states. Pharmacotherapeutics incorporates the principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting. Through reinforcement of the basic science principles relative to drug action, the student will learn to apply organ systems-based knowledge to clinical practice setting and learn associated disease state management. In addition to the lecture hours, these courses offer a required weekly recitation session. During recitations, students will engage in group activities and discussions related to patient cases that are based on select topics/disease states introduced in class during any given week. Students will be asked drug therapy management questions similar to those arising in real clinical settings. Prerequisites: PBSN 631, PHPN 581

SBAN 703 - Pharmaceutical Law and Biomedical ethics (3 Credits)

The primary goal of this course is to provide both general and specific concepts of jurisprudence and bioethics relating to the practice of pharmacy. A second goal is to inculcate our students with the ethical behaviors and knowledge of legal requirements to assure safe and quality patient pharmaceutical care. An examination and analysis of federal and New York laws that impact the practice of pharmacy, while emphasizing the legal and ethical principles applicable to daily decision making.

Elective** (0-3 Credits)

Total Credits = 16-19
P3 SPRING

PHPN 733 - Seminars in Pharmacy Practice I (1 Credit)

This sequence of courses will enable students to synthesize, integrate and apply the basic-science and pharmacotherapeutic principles prevalent in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. This course also provides an opportunity to update students on new modalities and treatment protocols in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. The courses will address these disease states from a basic science, clinical, and public health standpoint via a case-based learning approach, relating disease to appropriate therapeutic management, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care. In addition, these courses will emphasize the principles of self-directed learning through student-led presentations, interactive learning scenario stimulating real-world clinical experiences that allows students to practice and apply problem-solving skills, and accountability for assigned readings. These courses also serve to compliment the continuum between didactic and experiential courses. Independent learning, facilitated discussion, student-led presentations, and interactive learning activities will be utilized throughout the courses to give students an opportunity to build on previous course work by synthesizing, integrating, and applying biomedical, clinical, and public health concepts relevant to the pharmacy practice setting.

P4 FALL

PHPN 834 - Seminars in Pharmacy Practice II (1 Credit)

This sequence of courses will enable students to synthesize, integrate and apply the basic-science and pharmacotherapeutic principles prevalent in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. This course also provides an opportunity to update students on new modalities and treatment protocols in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. The courses will address these disease states from a basic science, clinical, and public health standpoint via a case-based learning approach, relating disease to appropriate therapeutic management, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care. In addition, these courses will emphasize the principles of self-directed learning through student-led presentations, interactive learning scenario stimulating real-world clinical experiences that allows students to practice and apply problem-solving skills, and accountability for assigned readings. These courses also serve to compliment the continuum between didactic and experiential courses. Independent learning, facilitated discussion, student-led presentations, and interactive learning activities will be utilized throughout the courses to give students an opportunity to build on previous course work by synthesizing, integrating, and applying biomedical, clinical, and public health concepts relevant to the pharmacy practice setting.

P4 SPRING

PHPN 835 - Seminars in Pharmacy Practice III (1 Credit)

This sequence of courses will enable students to synthesize, integrate and apply the basic-science and pharmacotherapeutic principles prevalent in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. This course also provides an opportunity to update students on new modalities and treatment protocols in both acute and chronic disease-state settings. The courses will address these disease states from a basic science, clinical, and public health standpoint via a case-based learning approach, relating disease to appropriate therapeutic management, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care. In addition, these courses will emphasize the principles of self-directed learning through student-led presentations, interactive learning scenario stimulating real-world clinical experiences that allows students to practice and apply problem-solving skills, and accountability for assigned readings. These courses also serve to complement the continuum between didactic and experiential courses. Independent learning, facilitated discussion, student-led presentations, and interactive learning activities will be utilized throughout the courses to give students an opportunity to build on previous course work by synthesizing, integrating, and applying biomedical, clinical, and public health concepts relevant to the pharmacy practice setting.

PHPN 855 - Pharmacy Practice Primers (2 Credits)

This course serves as a culminating review of the pharmacy curriculum to ensure students have the knowledge and skills to serve as pharmacists and pass the NAPLEX (North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination) which will be required for pharmacist licensure upon graduation. This course will consist of self-study and in-class review sessions. In-class review session will go hand-in-hand with self-study to help reinforce student knowledge of difficult topics and core topics. Review sessions will provide students with practice cases and questions and will help highlight and clarify key points to enhance student understanding of the material. The combination of self study with review sessions will promote self-directed lifelong learning and ultimately allow students to successfully practice as future pharmacists.

PHRN 820 - Advanced Pharmacy Calculations (2 Credits)

This course is designed to assess student knowledge gained over the 4 years of the pharmacy program and to ensure that students are adequately prepared to perform pharmaceutical calculations. This course serves as a culminating review of the pharmaceutical calculations to ensure students have the knowledge and skills to serve as pharmacists and pass the NAPLEX (North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination) which will be required for pharmacist licensure upon graduation. This course will consist of self-study and in-class review sessions. The combination of self-study with review sessions will promote self-directed lifelong learning and ultimately allow students to successfully practice as future pharmacists.
Prerequisites: PBSN 508, 635 and PHRN 610, 611

Total Credits = 7
Total PharmD Program Credits Required: 167

Credit Breakdown is: Didactic 103; IPPE: 10; APPE: 54

Notes: *Courses with laboratories or recitations.
**Two 3-credit didactic electives required. May be taken in the P2 fall semester, P2 spring semester and/or P3 fall semester.
***1-credit Compounding elective available during P4 year

Diverse Learning Styles

Much of the didactic coursework is primarily taught by lectures. Lectures often include embedded active-learning strategies such as audience-response (clickers), individual and/or group projects completed outside of class time.

For key courses such as pharmacy calculations and pharmacotherapeutics, recitations accompany the course, which allows for small group work on problem sets, case studies, and other interactive activities. Laboratories associated with the pharmaceutics courses allow hands-on experience in developing the motor skills necessary for dispensing prescriptions, extemporaneous compounding, and the preparation of sterile products while the laboratory in physical assessment allows for the development of other motor skills. All lectures are video recorded and available immediately after class so you have greater flexibility to learn at your own pace. Canvas, the College’s learning management system, is used extensively by all didactic courses. Every effort is made to post lecture handouts, PowerPoint slides, and assignments in advance, accommodating if you prefer to get an overview of materials before attending the lecture.